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Diachrony and typology of the english language through the texts.

Diachrony and typology of the english language through the texts.

Author: Ma del Carmen Guarddon Anelo
Publisher:
ISBN: 8492477512
Pages:
Year: 2011-08-30

Studies in Typology and Diachrony

Studies in Typology and Diachrony

Author: William Croft, Keith M. Denning, Suzanne Kemmer
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027228973
Pages: 243
Year: 1990-01-01
Joseph H. Greenberg is a towering figure in late twentieth century linguistics. His major contributions in the field have been in the area of typology and universals, virtually launched by his paper on word order universals, and in diachronic linguistics. The major thrust of Greenberg's work in the past three decades has been in the fusion of these two approaches to linguistic explanation into one, diachronic typology, the cross-linguistic analysis of languages as dynamic systems.This volume honors Greenberg on the occasion of his 75th birthday. It opens with an introduction discussing Greenberg's work at length and a full bibliography of his publications. It contains ten papers in typology, diachronic theory and diachronic typology by some of the leading linguists working in the research tradition inspired by Greenberg's work.
Typology and Universals

Typology and Universals

Author: William Croft
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521004993
Pages: 341
Year: 2002-11-21
A thorough rewriting to reflect advances in typology and universals in the past decade.
Typology and Universals

Typology and Universals

Author: William Croft
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521004993
Pages: 341
Year: 2002-11-21
A thorough rewriting to reflect advances in typology and universals in the past decade.
Types of Variation

Types of Variation

Author: Terttu Nevalainen, Juhani Klemola, Mikko Laitinen
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027230862
Pages: 378
Year: 2006-01-01
This volume interfaces three fields of linguistics rarely discussed in the same context. Its underlying theme is linguistic variation, and the ways in which historical linguists and dialectologists may learn from insights offered by typology, and vice versa. The aim of the contributions is to raise the awareness of these linguistic subdisciplines of each other and to encourage their cross-fertilization to their mutual benefit. If linguistic typology is to unify the study of all types of linguistic variation, this variation, both diatopic and diachronic, will enrich typological research itself. With the aim of capturing the relevant dimensions of variation, the studies in this volume make use of new methodologies, including electronic corpora and databases, which enable cross- and intralinguistic comparisons dialectally and across time. Based on original research and unified by an innovative theme, the volume will be of interest to both students and teachers of linguistics and Germanic languages.
The Diachrony of Verb Meaning

The Diachrony of Verb Meaning

Author: Elly van Gelderen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351719025
Pages: 294
Year: 2018-02-01
This innovative volume offers a comprehensive account of the study of language change in verb meaning in the history of the English language. Integrating both the author’s previous body of work and new research, the book explores the complex dynamic between linguistic structures, morphosyntactic and semantics, and the conceptual domain of meaning, employing a consistent theoretical treatment for analyzing different classes of predicates. Building on this analysis, each chapter connects the implications of these findings from diachronic change with data from language acquisition, offering a unique perspective on the faculty of language and the cognitive system. In bringing together a unique combination of theoretical approaches to provide an in-depth analysis of the history of diachronic change in verb meaning, this book is a key resource to researchers in historical linguistics, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, language acquisition, and the history of English.
Synchrony and Diachrony

Synchrony and Diachrony

Author: Anna Giacalone Ramat, Caterina Mauri, Piera Molinelli
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027272077
Pages: 450
Year: 2013-05-31
The focus of this volume is on the relation between synchrony and diachrony. It is examined in the light of the most recent theories of language change and linguistic variation. What has traditionally been treated as a dichotomy is now seen rather in terms of a dynamic interface. The contributions to this volume aim at exploring the most adequate tools to describe and understand the manifestations of this dynamic interface. Thorough analyses are offered on hot topics of the current linguistic debate, which are all involved in the analysis of the synchrony-diachrony interface: gradualness of change, synchronic variation and gradience, constructional approaches to grammaticalization, the role of contact-induced transfer in language change, analogy. Case studies are discussed from a variety of languages and dialects including English, Welsh, Latin, Italian and Italian dialects, Dutch, Swedish, German and German dialects, Hungarian. This volume is of great interest to a broad audience within linguistics, including historical linguistics, typology, pragmatics, and areal linguistics.
Diachrony of differential argument marking

Diachrony of differential argument marking

Author: Ilja A. Seržant, Alena Witzlack-Makarevich
Publisher: Language Science Press
ISBN: 3961100853
Pages: 563
Year:
While there are languages that code a particular grammatical role (e.g. subject or direct object) in one and the same way across the board, many more languages code the same grammatical roles differentially. The variables which condition the differential argument marking (or DAM) pertain to various properties of the NP (such as animacy or definiteness) or to event semantics or various properties of the clause. While the main line of current research on DAM is mainly synchronic the volume tackles the diachronic perspective. The tenet is that the emergence and the development of differential marking systems provide a different kind of evidence for the understanding of the phenomenon. The present volume consists of 18 chapters and primarily brings together diachronic case studies on particular languages or language groups including e.g. Finno-Ugric, Sino-Tibetan and Japonic languages. The volume also includes a position paper, which provides an overview of the typology of different subtypes of DAM systems, a chapter on computer simulation of the emergence of DAM and a chapter devoted to the cross-linguistic effects of referential hierarchies on DAM.
Tense and Aspect in Indo-European Languages

Tense and Aspect in Indo-European Languages

Author: John Hewson
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027236496
Pages: 403
Year: 1997-01-01
This monograph presents a general picture of the evolution of IE verbal systems within a coherent cognitive framework. The work encompasses all the language families of the IE phylum, from prehistory to present day languages. Inspired by the ideas of Roman Jakobson and Gustave Guillaume the authors relate tense and aspect to underlying cognitive processes, and show that verbal systems have a staged development of time representations (chronogenesis). They view linguistic change as systemic and trace the evolution of the earliest tense systems by (a) aspectual split and (b) aspectual merger from the original aspectual contrasts of PIE, the evidence for such systemic change showing clearly in the paradigmatic morphology of the daughter languages. The nineteen chapters cover first the ancient documentation, then those families whose historical data are from a more recent date. The last chapters deal with the systemic evolution of languages that are descended from ancient forbears such as Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin, and are completed by a chapter on the practical and theoretical conclusions of the work.
The Oxford Handbook of the History of English

The Oxford Handbook of the History of English

Author: Terttu Nevalainen, Elizabeth Closs Traugott
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190627883
Pages: 984
Year: 2016-08
The availability of large electronic corpora has caused major shifts in linguistic research, including the ability to analyze much more data than ever before, and to perform micro-analyses of linguistic structures across languages. This has historical linguists to rethink many standard assumptions about language history, and methods and approaches that are relevant to the study of it. The field is now interested in, and attracts, specialists whose fields range from statistical modeling to acoustic phonetics. These changes have even transformed linguists' perceptions of the very processes of language change, particularly in English, the most studied language in historical linguistics due to the size of available data and its status as a global language. The Oxford Handbook of the History of English takes stock of recent advances in the study of the history of English, broadening and deepening the understanding of the field. It seeks to suggest ways to rethink the relationship of English's past with its present, and make transparent the variety of conditions and processes that have been instrumental in shaping that history. Setting a new standard of cross-theoretical collaboration, it covers the field in an innovative way, providing diachronic accounts of major influences such as language contact, and typological processes that have shaped English and its varieties, as well as highlighting recent and ongoing developments of Englishes--celebrating the vitality of language change over the centuries and the many contexts and processes through which language change occurs.
Language and Speech in Synchrony and Diachrony

Language and Speech in Synchrony and Diachrony

Author: Galina T. Polenova, Tatiana G. Klikushina
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443892319
Pages: 415
Year: 2017-05-11
This collection arises from the Fifth International Scientific Conference, “Language and Speech in Synchrony and Diachrony”, held in Taganrog, Russia, devoted to the memory of Russian linguist and philosopher Professor P.V. Chesnokov. It examines the functioning of different levels of linguistic units and categories of speech with regard to intra-and cross-cultural communication in pragmatics of speech. The theory of language and speech is represented not only in synchrony, but in diachrony, in the comparative and typological aspects of languages from various groups, including non-literate Yenisei languages. A further subject of discussion within is the problem of translation, and the relation of language and speech, text and discourse. The volume consists of six parts: Part I: Language and its grammatical categories in diachronic aspect; Part II: Grammar and other subsystems of the language; Part III: Cross-cultural communication and translation; Part IV: Problems of linguistic and diachronic typology; Part V: Pragmalinguistics and speech; and Part VI: Text, discourse, speech in anthropocentric paradigm. The book will be of interest to scholars of philology, linguistics, culture and humanities, as well as those interested in issues of language, culture and language teaching methods.
To be or not to be? The Verbum Substantivum from Synchronic, Diachronic and Typological Perspectives

To be or not to be? The Verbum Substantivum from Synchronic, Diachronic and Typological Perspectives

Author: Michail L. Kotin, Richard Whitt
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 144388491X
Pages: 380
Year: 2015-10-13
The verbs of the 'to be'-group, also called verba substantiva, belong to the most enigmatic phenomena of the human language. Combining a distinct suppletivity of their conjugational forms in most languages with a striking semantic and functional ambiguity, as well as unique syntactic capabilities, they form a very specific class of linguistic entities. They can be referred to, without exaggeration, as one of the conceptually gravest and most "symptomatic" language formations. Typologically, the be-verbs demonstrate, on the one hand, a set of similar features in almost every language, which is excellent evidence of their universal validity. On the other hand, the differences between these verbs in various language groups and even in particular languages are remarkable proof of language relativism. Historically, the be-verbs show a sequence of relevant stages in their formal, semantic and syntactic developments, which in many aspects coincide with their typological and individual, "idioethnic" features and properties. One can trace, among other things, paths and mechanisms of their development and salient changes of their functions in language systems of different types. Especially important are also changes in the form and function of the be-verbs arising from language contact, for they indicate essential tendencies in the evolution of these entities accelerated by the influence of language interaction triggers. The contribution of to be-verbs to the morphology, semantics and syntax of the majority of the languages of the world is substantial from a number of perspectives, and these verbs belong to the most complex and simultaneously central entities of human language. For this reason their analysis must continually be synchronized with the newest results of general linguistic research. This volume, hence, describes and interprets the to be-verbs and constructions in the broad context of contemporary linguistic research, including synchrony, diachrony, diatopy, language contrast and typology.
The Diachrony of Grammar

The Diachrony of Grammar

Author: T. Givón
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company
ISBN: 9027268886
Pages: 928
Year: 2015-09-15
The case-studies assembled in these two volumes span a lifetime of research into the diachrony of grammar. That is, into the rise and fall of syntactic constructions and their attendant grammatical morphology. While focused squarely on the data, the studies are nonetheless cast in an explicit theoretical perspective – adaptive, developmental, variationist. Taken as a whole, this work constitutes a frontal assault on Ferdinand de Saussure's corrosive legacy in linguistics. Over the years, reviewers slapped the author's wrist periodically for having dared to commit that most heinous of sins against de Saussure's hallowed legacy – panchronic grammar. In this work he pleads guilty, having never seen a piece of synchronic data that didn't reek, to high heaven, of the diachrony that gave it rise. Reek in two distinct ways: first with the frozen relics of the past that prompt us to reconstruct prior diachronic states; and second with the synchronic variation that hints at ongoing change. Conversely, the author confesses to having never seen a diachronic explanation that did not hinge on the synchronic principles – Carnap's general propositions – that govern language behavior. The synchrony and diachrony of grammar are twin faces of the same coin. To study one without the other is to gut both. By understanding how synchronic grammars come into being we also understand the cognitive, communicative, neurological and developmental universals that constrain diachronic change – and through it synchronic typology.
The Diachronic Typology of Non-Canonical Subjects

The Diachronic Typology of Non-Canonical Subjects

Author: Ilja A. Serzant, Leonid Kulikov
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027271305
Pages: 364
Year: 2013-11-15
This volume is an important contribution to the diachrony of non-canonical subjects in a typological perspective. The questions addressed concern the internal mechanisms and triggers for various changes that non-canonical subjects undergo, ranging from semantic motivations to purely structural explanations. The discussion encompasses the whole life-cycle of non-canonical subjects: from their emergence out of non-subject arguments to their expansion, demise or canonicization, focusing primarily on syntactic changes and changes in case-marking. The volume offers a number of different case studies comprising such languages as Italian, Spanish, Old Norse and Russian as well as languages less studied in this context, such as Latin, Classical Armenian, Baltic languages and some East Caucasian languages. Typological generalizations in the form of recurrent developmental paths are offered on the basis of data presented in this volume and in the literature.
Introduction to Typology

Introduction to Typology

Author: Lindsay J. Whaley
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 080395963X
Pages: 323
Year: 1997
Ideal in introductory courses dealing with grammatical structure and linguistic analysis, Introduction to Typology overviews the major grammatical categories and constructions in the world's languages. Framed in a typological perspective, the constant concern of this primary text is to underscore the similarities and differences which underlie the vast array of human languages.