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The Mayflower Generation

The Mayflower Generation

Author: Rebecca Fraser
Publisher: Chatto & Windus
ISBN: 0701177624
Pages: 384
Year: 2016-11-15
The voyage of the Mayflower and the founding of Plymouth Colony is one of the seminal events in world history. But the poorly-equipped group of English Puritans who ventured across the Atlantic in the early autumn of 1620 had no sense they would pass into legend. They had eighty casks of butter and two dogs but no cattle for milk, meat, or ploughing. They were ill-prepared for the brutal journey and the new land that few of them could comprehend. But the Mayflower story did not end with these Pilgrims' arrival on the coast of New England or their first uncertain years as settlers. Rebecca Fraser traces two generations of one ordinary family and their extraordinary response to the challenges of life in America. Edward Winslow, an apprentice printer born in Worcestershire, fled England and then Holland for a life of religious freedom and opportunity. Despite the intense physical trials of settlement, he found America exotic, enticing, and endlessly interesting. He built a home and a family, and his remarkable friendship with King Massassoit, Chief of the Wampanoags, is part of the legend of Thanksgiving. Yet, fifty years later, Edward's son Josiah was commanding the New England militias against Massassoit's son in King Philip's War. The Mayflower Generation is an intensely human portrait of the Winslow family written with the pace of an epic. Rebecca Fraser details domestic life in the seventeenth century, the histories of brave and vocal Puritan women and the contradictions between generations as fathers and sons made the painful decisions which determined their future in America.
The Mayflower

The Mayflower

Author: Rebecca Fraser
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250108586
Pages: 640
Year: 2017-11-07
From acclaimed historian and biographer Rebecca Fraser comes a vivid narrative history of the Mayflower and of the Winslow family, who traveled to America in search of a new world. “There is nothing sleep-inducing about the chronicle crafted by Ms. Fraser . . . There is more to the Pilgrims’ story—more to American identity and character—than our Thanksgiving rituals and reveries.” —Wall Street Journal The voyage of the Mayflower and the founding of Plymouth Colony is one of the seminal events in world history. But the poorly-equipped group of English Puritans who ventured across the Atlantic in the early autumn of 1620 had no sense they would pass into legend. They had eighty casks of butter and two dogs but no cattle for milk, meat, or ploughing. They were ill-prepared for the brutal journey and the new land that few of them could comprehend. But the Mayflower story did not end with these Pilgrims’ arrival on the coast of New England or their first uncertain years as settlers. Rebecca Fraser traces two generations of one ordinary family and their extraordinary response to the challenges of life in America. Edward Winslow, an apprentice printer, fled England and then Holland for a life of religious freedom and opportunity. Despite the intense physical trials of settlement, he found America exotic, enticing, and endlessly interesting. He built a home and a family, and his remarkable friendship with King Massassoit, Chief of the Wampanoags, is part of the legend of Thanksgiving. Yet, fifty years later, Edward’s son Josiah was commanding the New England militias against Massassoit’s son in King Philip’s War. The Mayflower is an intensely human portrait of the Winslow family written with the pace of an epic. Rebecca Fraser details domestic life in the seventeenth century, the histories of brave and vocal Puritan women and the contradictions between generations as fathers and sons made the painful decisions which determined their future in America.
The Story of Britain: From the Romans to the Present: A Narrative History

The Story of Britain: From the Romans to the Present: A Narrative History

Author: Rebecca Fraser
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393072495
Pages: 848
Year: 2006-11-17
“A beautifully written story, a box of delights, a treasure trove: final proof of truth’s superiority over fiction.”—Andrew Roberts Rebecca Fraser's dramatic portrayal of the larger-than-life characters who forged Britain's national institutions is an enjoyable introduction to British history and a useful chronology of the past. A highly readable account of the men and women who created turning points in history, it is packed with anecdotes about British scientists, explorers, soldiers, traders, writers, and artists.
Emigrants

Emigrants

Author: James Evans
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
ISBN: 0297866915
Pages: 352
Year: 2017-07-06
AN EVENING STANDARD NO. 1 BESTSELLER 'Marvellously engaging' THE TIMES 'Brisk, informative and eye-opening' DAILY TELEGRAPH During the course of the seventeenth century nearly 400,000 people left Britain for the Americas, most of them from England. Crossing the Atlantic was a major undertaking, the voyage long and treacherous. There was little hope of returning to see the friends and family who stayed behind. Why did so many go? A significant number went for religious reasons, either on the Mayflower or as part of the mass migration to New England; some sought their fortunes in gold, fish or fur; some went to farm tobacco in Virginia, a booming trade which would enmesh Europe in a new addiction. Some went because they were loyal to the deposed Stuart king, while others yearned for an entirely new ambition - the freedom to think as they chose. Then there were the desperate: starving and impoverished people who went because things had not worked out in the Old World and there was little to lose from trying again in the New. EMIGRANTS casts light on this unprecedented population shift - a phenomenon that underpins the rise of modern America. Using contemporary sources including diaries, court hearings and letters, James Evans brings to light the extraordinary personal stories of the men and women who made the journey of a lifetime.
Mourt's Relation

Mourt's Relation

Author: Dwight B. Heath
Publisher: Applewood Books
ISBN: 0918222842
Pages: 96
Year: 1986
Presents an account, first published in 1622, of the Pilgrim's journey to the new world.
Mayflower

Mayflower

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101218835
Pages: 480
Year: 2006-05-09
"Vivid and remarkably fresh...Philbrick has recast the Pilgrims for the ages." --The New York Times Book Review Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history New York Times Book Review Top Ten books of the Year How did America begin? That simple question launches the acclaimed author of Bunker Hill and Valiant Ambition on an extraordinary journey to understand the truth behind our most sacred national myth: the voyage of the Mayflower and the settlement of Plymouth Colony. As Philbrick reveals in this electrifying history of the Pilgrims, the story of Plymouth Colony was a fifty-five year epic that began in peril and ended in war. New England erupted into a bloody conflict that nearly wiped out the English colonists and natives alike. These events shaped the existing communites and the country that would grow from them. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Making Haste from Babylon

Making Haste from Babylon

Author: Nick Bunker
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307593002
Pages: 512
Year: 2010-04-13
At the end of 1618, a blazing green star soared across the night sky over the northern hemisphere. From the Philippines to the Arctic, the comet became a sensation and a symbol, a warning of doom or a promise of salvation. Two years later, as the Pilgrims prepared to sail across the Atlantic on board the Mayflower, the atmosphere remained charged with fear and expectation. Men and women readied themselves for war, pestilence, or divine retribution. Against this background, and amid deep economic depression, the Pilgrims conceived their enterprise of exile. Within a decade, despite crisis and catastrophe, they built a thriving settlement at New Plymouth, based on beaver fur, corn, and cattle. In doing so, they laid the foundations for Massachusetts, New England, and a new nation. Using a wealth of new evidence from landscape, archaeology, and hundreds of overlooked or neglected documents, Nick Bunker gives a vivid and strikingly original account of the Mayflower project and the first decade of the Plymouth Colony. From mercantile London and the rural England of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I to the mountains and rivers of Maine, he weaves a rich narrative that combines religion, politics, money, science, and the sea. The Pilgrims were entrepreneurs as well as evangelicals, political radicals as well as Christian idealists. Making Haste from Babylon tells their story in unrivaled depth, from their roots in religious conflict and village strife at home to their final creation of a permanent foothold in America. From the Hardcover edition.
The Boy who Fell Off the Mayflower, Or, John Howland's Good Fortune

The Boy who Fell Off the Mayflower, Or, John Howland's Good Fortune

Author: P. J. Lynch
Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
ISBN: 0763665843
Pages: 64
Year: 2015
An illustrated account of the life of John Howland, the young servant who was indentured to Pilgrim John Carver, describes how he embarked on the Mayflower and survived a fall off the ship before helping his ill shipmates by scouting out a safe harbor.
History of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647

History of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647

Author: William Bradford
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1912

They Came for Freedom

They Came for Freedom

Author: Jay Milbrandt
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
ISBN: 0718037863
Pages: 320
Year: 2017-10-03
A page-turning story of the Pilgrims, the courageous band of freedom-seekers who set out for a new life for themselves and forever changed the course of history. Once a year at Thanksgiving, we encounter Pilgrims as folksy people in funny hats before promptly forgetting them. In the centuries since America began, the Pilgrims have been relegated to folklore and children’s stories, fairy-tale mascots for holiday parties and greeting cards. The true story of the Pilgrim Fathers could not be more different. Beginning with the execution of two pastors deviating from the Elizabethan Church of England, the Pilgrims’ great journey was one of courageous faith, daring escape, and tenuous survival. Theirs is the story of refugees who fled intense religious persecution; of dreamers who voyaged the Atlantic and into the unknown when all other attempts had led to near-certain death; of survivors who struggled with newfound freedom. Loneliness led to starvation, tension gave way to war with natives, and suspicion broke the back of the very freedom they endeavored to achieve. Despite the pain and turmoil of this high stakes triumph, the Pilgrim Fathers built the cornerstone for a nation dedicated to faith, freedom, and thankfulness. This is the epic story of the Pilgrims, an adventure that laid the bedrock for the Founding Fathers, the Constitution, and the American identity.
The Winthrop Woman

The Winthrop Woman

Author: Anya Seton
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547523963
Pages: 586
Year: 2014-04-22
“The Winthrop Woman is that rare literary accomplishment — living history. Really good fictionalized history [like this] often gives closer reality to a period than do factual records.” – Chicago Tribune In 1631 Elizabeth Winthrop, newly widowed with an infant daughter, set sail for the New World. Against a background of rigidity and conformity she dared to befriend Anne Hutchinson at the moment of her banishment from the Massachusetts Bay Colony; dared to challenge a determined army captain bent on the massacre of her friends the Siwanoy Indians; and, above all, dared to love a man as her heart and her whole being commanded. And so, as a response to this almost unmatched courage and vitality, Governor John Winthrop came to refer to this woman in the historical records of the time as his “unregenerate niece.” Anya Seton’s riveting historical novel portrays the fortitude, humiliation, and ultimate triumph of the Winthrop woman, who believed in a concept of happiness transcending that of her own day. “A rich and panoramic narrative full of gusto, sentimentality and compassion. It is bound to give much enjoyment and a good many thrills.” – Times Literary Supplement “Abundant and juicy entertainment.” – New York Times
A Deaf Artist in Early America

A Deaf Artist in Early America

Author: Harlan L. Lane, John Brewster
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807066168
Pages: 190
Year: 2004
A profile of the renowned portrait artist includes twenty-seven color images as well as new information about the artist's involvement in the American Deaf-World, the first school for the deaf in Hartford, Connecticut. First serial, Deaf Life.
Embedded in America: The Onion Complete News Archives

Embedded in America: The Onion Complete News Archives

Author: Carol Kolb, Amie Barrodale
Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)
ISBN: 1400054567
Pages: 312
Year: 2005
An anthology encompassing hundreds of articles from October 2003 through November 2004, including "Catholic Church Condemns Metrosexuality" and "Documents Reveal Gaps in Bush's Service as President."
God, War, and Providence

God, War, and Providence

Author: James A. Warren
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501180436
Pages: 304
Year: 2018-06-12
“Warren transforms what could have been merely a Pilgrim version of cowboys and Indians into a sharp study of cultural contrast… a well-researched cameo of early America.” —Roger Lowenstein, The Wall Street Journal The tragic and fascinating history of the first epic struggle between white settlers and Native Americans in the early seventeenth century: a fresh look at the aggressive expansionist Puritans in New England and the determined Narragansett Indians, who refused to back down and accept English authority over people and their land. A devout Puritan minister in seventeenth-century New England, Roger Williams was also a social critic, diplomat, theologian, and politician who fervently believed in tolerance. Yet his orthodox brethren were convinced tolerance fostered anarchy and courted God’s wrath. Banished from Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635, Williams purchased land from the Narragansett Indians and laid the foundations for the colony of Rhode Island as a place where Indian and English cultures could flourish side by side, in peace. As the seventeenth century wore on, a steadily deepening antagonism developed between an expansionist, aggressive Puritan culture and an increasingly vulnerable, politically divided Indian population. Indian tribes that had been at the center of the New England communities found themselves shunted off to the margins of the region. By the 1660s, all the major Indian peoples in southern New England had come to accept English authority, either tacitly or explicitly. All, except one: the Narragansetts. In God, War, and Providence James A. Warren tells the remarkable and little-known story of the alliance between Roger Williams’s Rhode Island and the Narragansett Indians, and how they joined forces to retain their autonomy and their distinctive ways of life against Puritan encroachment. Deeply researched, vividly written, this account of the Narragansetts’ courageous resistance campaign, aided by Williams, serves as a telling precedent for white-Native American encounters along the North American frontier for the next 250 years.
The Pilgrim Chronicles

The Pilgrim Chronicles

Author: Rod Gragg
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1621572781
Pages: 256
Year: 2014-10-13
All Americans are familiar with the story of the Pilgrims—persecuted for their religion in the Old World, they crossed the ocean to settle in a wild and dangerous land. But for most of us, the story ends after their brutal first winter at Plymouth with a supposedly peaceful encounter with the Native Americans and a happy Thanksgiving. Now, through the vivid memoirs, letters, and personal accounts in The Pilgrim Chronicles, you will discover the full, compelling story of their anguished journey and heroic strength. Award-winning historian Rod Gragg brings the Pilgrims to life in this lavishly illustrated guide, filled with moving, eyewitness narratives. From their persecution in England and painful exile in Holland to their voyage across the Atlantic and their struggle to survive among the Indians in an untamed wilderness, Gragg takes you on the harrowing and inspiring journey of a people seeking religious freedom.