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Vers la cohabitation

Vers la cohabitation

Author: Judith Butler
Publisher: Fayard
ISBN: 2213676143
Pages: 360
Year: 2013-10-02
Dans cet ouvrage, Judith Butler s’interroge sur la possibilité d’articuler les expériences juives de la diaspora et du déplacement et les expériences palestiniennes de la dépossession pour fonder une nouvelle éthique de la cohabitation dans la région et renouer avec la solution politique d’un État binational. La cohabitation non voulue est une condition de notre vie politique, et non quelque chose que nous pouvons mettre à mal. Nul n’est en droit de choisir avec qui cohabiter sur cette terre. Judith Butler puise dans la philosophie juive de quoi élaborer une critique du sionisme politique, de la violence d’État, du nationalisme et du colonialisme de l’État d’Israël. Pour elle, il est important de mettre en question la prétention d’Israël à représenter les Juifs. Elle engage ainsi la discussion avec des auteurs comme Hannah Arendt, Emmanuel Levinas, Primo Levi, Martin Buber, Walter Benjamin, mais aussi Edward Said ou Mahmoud Darwich. Selon Judith Butler, l’éthique de la judéité exige une critique du sionisme et ouvre la possibilité de réaliser un idéal politique de cohabitation au sein d’une démocratie radicale.
Is Theory Good for the Jews?

Is Theory Good for the Jews?

Author: Bruno Chaouat
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1781383340
Pages: 224
Year: 2016-12-31
For at least fifteen years, any keen observer of European society has been aware that antisemitism is no longer a matter of racial theory, nationalism, or exclusion of the "other." While in the past antisemites saw Jews as all too modern "rootless cosmopolitans" (to use Stalin's expression), today's European antisemitism construes them as obsolete precisely because they are attached to their roots, their land, their community, their origin. The Jews are now perceived as a reactionary force that hinders the progress of humankind toward multiculturalism, understood as the peaceful, infinitely enriching coexistence of ethnicities, races, religions, and cultures within the same territory. The antisemite of yore viewed the Jews as an inferior race; today he views them as racist. By looking back to the emergence of a postwar theoretical discourse on trauma, memory, victims, suffering, the Holocaust and the Jews, Is Theory Good for the Jews? explores how "French thought" is implicated in intellectual, literary and ideological components of the global and local upsurge of antisemitism. The author probes the legacy of Heidegger in France and exposes the shortcomings of radical social critique and postcolonial theory confronted with the challenge of Islamic terrorism and Jew hatred. This book is the first effort to analyze French responses that have regrettably played their part in generating the new antisemitism.
Parting Ways

Parting Ways

Author: Judith Butler
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231146116
Pages: 256
Year: 2013-11-01
Judith Butler follows Edward Said’s late suggestion that through a consideration of Palestinian dispossession in relation to Jewish diasporic traditions a new ethos can be forged for a one-state solution. Butler engages Jewish philosophical positions to articulate a critique of political Zionism and its practices of illegitimate state violence, nationalism, and state-sponsored racism. At the same time, she moves beyond communitarian frameworks, including Jewish ones, that fail to arrive at a radical democratic notion of political cohabitation. Butler engages thinkers such as Edward Said, Emmanuel Levinas, Hannah Arendt, Primo Levi, Martin Buber, Walter Benjamin, and Mahmoud Darwish as she articulates a new political ethic. In her view, it is as important to dispute Israel’s claim to represent the Jewish people as it is to show that a narrowly Jewish framework cannot suffice as a basis for an ultimate critique of Zionism. She promotes an ethical position in which the obligations of cohabitation do not derive from cultural sameness but from the unchosen character of social plurality. Recovering the arguments of Jewish thinkers who offered criticisms of Zionism or whose work could be used for such a purpose, Butler disputes the specific charge of anti-Semitic self-hatred often leveled against Jewish critiques of Israel. Her political ethic relies on a vision of cohabitation that thinks anew about binationalism and exposes the limits of a communitarian framework to overcome the colonial legacy of Zionism. Her own engagements with Edward Said and Mahmoud Darwish form an important point of departure and conclusion for her engagement with some key forms of thought derived in part from Jewish resources, but always in relation to the non-Jew. Butler considers the rights of the dispossessed, the necessity of plural cohabitation, and the dangers of arbitrary state violence, showing how they can be extended to a critique of Zionism, even when that is not their explicit aim. She revisits and affirms Edward Said’s late proposals for a one-state solution within the ethos of binationalism. Butler’s startling suggestion: Jewish ethics not only demand a critique of Zionism, but must transcend its exclusive Jewishness in order to realize the ethical and political ideals of living together in radical democracy.
Psychanalyse et hybridité

Psychanalyse et hybridité

Author: Thamy Ayouch
Publisher: Leuven University Press
ISBN: 9462701288
Pages: 222
Year: 2018-01-23
Le discours psychanalytique aux sujets non majoritaires, minorisés et altérisés Le genre, la langue et l’ethnicité sont souvent les catégories aveugles de certains discours psychanalytiques prétendant se déployer depuis la position, non située, de l’universel. La psychanalyse n’a toutefois pas pour vocation d’assigner des normes, ni au genres et sexualités, ni aux différences ethniques et culturelles. En posant la question du rapport du discours psychanalytique aux sujets non majoritaires, minorisés et altérisés, le propos de cet ouvrage est de penser des instruments métapsychologiques susceptibles de saisir la singularité d’identifications contemporaines par delà la normativité sociale, culturelle et politique de la binarité des sexes ou de l’universalité culturelle. L’ouvrage propose alors les motifs d’une hybridité structurelle, moteur de l’écoute et de la théorisation analytiques, et d’une hybridation programmatique de la psychanalyse par les perspectives des études de genre et queer et des études postcoloniales et décoloniales.
The Invention of the Land of Israel: From Holy Land to Homeland

The Invention of the Land of Israel: From Holy Land to Homeland

Author: Shlomo Sand
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844679462
Pages: 295
Year: 2012-11-20
Evaluates the notions of a Promised Land to explain why Israel has become the site of the longest running national struggle of the twentieth century, posing a controversial argument that the concept of a "Land of Israel" facilitated colonization and is threatening the existence of the Jewish state today.
What Is a Palestinian State Worth?

What Is a Palestinian State Worth?

Author: Sari Nusseibeh
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674059492
Pages: 256
Year: 2012-02-27
For over sixty years, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been subjected to many solutions and offered many answers by diverse parties. Yet, answers are only as good as the questions that beget them. It is with this simple, but powerful idea, the idea of asking the basic questions anew, that the renowned Palestinian philosopher and activist Sari Nusseibeh begins his book.
Muslims and Jews in France

Muslims and Jews in France

Author: Maud S. Mandel
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 140084858X
Pages: 272
Year: 2014-01-05
This book traces the global, national, and local origins of the conflict between Muslims and Jews in France, challenging the belief that rising anti-Semitism in France is rooted solely in the unfolding crisis in Israel and Palestine. Maud Mandel shows how the conflict in fact emerged from processes internal to French society itself even as it was shaped by affairs elsewhere, particularly in North Africa during the era of decolonization. Mandel examines moments in which conflicts between Muslims and Jews became a matter of concern to French police, the media, and an array of self-appointed spokesmen from both communities: Israel's War of Independence in 1948, France's decolonization of North Africa, the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, the 1968 student riots, and François Mitterrand's experiments with multiculturalism in the 1980s. She takes an in-depth, on-the-ground look at interethnic relations in Marseille, which is home to the country's largest Muslim and Jewish populations outside of Paris. She reveals how Muslims and Jews in France have related to each other in diverse ways throughout this history--as former residents of French North Africa, as immigrants competing for limited resources, as employers and employees, as victims of racist aggression, as religious minorities in a secularizing state, and as French citizens. In Muslims and Jews in France, Mandel traces the way these multiple, complex interactions have been overshadowed and obscured by a reductionist narrative of Muslim-Jewish polarization.
The Invention of the Jewish People

The Invention of the Jewish People

Author: Shlomo Sand, Yael Lotan
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 1844676234
Pages: 344
Year: 2010-06-14
"Anyone interested in understanding the contemporary Middle East should read this book." Tony Judt --
A History of Jewish-Muslim Relations

A History of Jewish-Muslim Relations

Author: Abdelwahab Meddeb, Benjamin Stora
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400849136
Pages: 1152
Year: 2013-11-27
This is the first encyclopedic guide to the history of relations between Jews and Muslims around the world from the birth of Islam to today. Richly illustrated and beautifully produced, the book features more than 150 authoritative and accessible articles by an international team of leading experts in history, politics, literature, anthropology, and philosophy. Organized thematically and chronologically, this indispensable reference provides critical facts and balanced context for greater historical understanding and a more informed dialogue between Jews and Muslims. Part I covers the medieval period; Part II, the early modern period through the nineteenth century, in the Ottoman Empire, Africa, Asia, and Europe; Part III, the twentieth century, including the exile of Jews from the Muslim world, Jews and Muslims in Israel, and Jewish-Muslim politics; and Part IV, intersections between Jewish and Muslim origins, philosophy, scholarship, art, ritual, and beliefs. The main articles address major topics such as the Jews of Arabia at the origin of Islam; special profiles cover important individuals and places; and excerpts from primary sources provide contemporary views on historical events. Contributors include Mark R. Cohen, Alain Dieckhoff, Michael Laskier, Vera Moreen, Gordon D. Newby, Marina Rustow, Daniel Schroeter, Kirsten Schulze, Mark Tessler, John Tolan, Gilles Veinstein, and many more. Covers the history of relations between Jews and Muslims around the world from the birth of Islam to today Written by an international team of leading scholars Features in-depth articles on social, political, and cultural history Includes profiles of important people (Eliyahu Capsali, Joseph Nasi, Mohammed V, Martin Buber, Anwar Sadat and Menachem Begin, Edward Said, Messali Hadj, Mahmoud Darwish) and places (Jerusalem, Alexandria, Baghdad) Presents passages from essential documents of each historical period, such as the Cairo Geniza, Al-Sira, and Judeo-Persian illuminated manuscripts Richly illustrated with more than 250 images, including maps and color photographs Includes extensive cross-references, bibliographies, and an index
Under Crescent and Cross

Under Crescent and Cross

Author: Mark R. Cohen
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 069101082X
Pages: 280
Year: 1994
Did Muslims and Jews in the Middle Ages cohabit in a peaceful "interfaith utopia?" Or were Jews under Muslim rule persecuted, much as they were in Christian lands? Rejecting both polemically charged "myths," Mark Cohen offers a systematic comparison of Jewish life in medieval Islam and Christendom--the first in-depth explanation of why medieval Islamic-Jewish relations, though not utopic, were less confrontational and violent than those between Christians and Jews in the West.
Getting Respect

Getting Respect

Author: Michèle Lamont, Graziella Moraes Silva, Jessica Welburn, Joshua Guetzkow, Nissim Mizrachi, Hanna Herzog, Elisa Reis
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400883776
Pages: 400
Year: 2016-09-06
Racism is a common occurrence for members of marginalized groups around the world. Getting Respect illuminates their experiences by comparing three countries with enduring group boundaries: the United States, Brazil and Israel. The authors delve into what kinds of stigmatizing or discriminatory incidents individuals encounter in each country, how they respond to these occurrences, and what they view as the best strategy—whether individually, collectively, through confrontation, or through self-improvement—for dealing with such events. This deeply collaborative and integrated study draws on more than four hundred in-depth interviews with middle- and working-class men and women residing in and around multiethnic cities—New York City, Rio de Janeiro, and Tel Aviv—to compare the discriminatory experiences of African Americans, black Brazilians, and Arab Palestinian citizens of Israel, as well as Israeli Ethiopian Jews and Mizrahi (Sephardic) Jews. Detailed analysis reveals significant differences in group behavior: Arab Palestinians frequently remain silent due to resignation and cynicism while black Brazilians see more stigmatization by class than by race, and African Americans confront situations with less hesitation than do Ethiopian Jews and Mizrahim, who tend to downplay their exclusion. The authors account for these patterns by considering the extent to which each group is actually a group, the sociohistorical context of intergroup conflict, and the national ideologies and other cultural repertoires that group members rely on. Getting Respect is a rich and daring book that opens many new perspectives into, and sets a new global agenda for, the comparative analysis of race and ethnicity.
The Question of Zion

The Question of Zion

Author: Jacqueline Rose
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400826527
Pages: 232
Year: 2007-02-05
Zionism was inspired as a movement--one driven by the search for a homeland for the stateless and persecuted Jewish people. Yet it trampled the rights of the Arabs in Palestine. Today it has become so controversial that it defies understanding and trumps reasoned public debate. So argues prominent British writer Jacqueline Rose, who uses her political and psychoanalytic skills in this book to take an unprecedented look at Zionism--one of the most powerful ideologies of modern times. Rose enters the inner world of the movement and asks a new set of questions. How did Zionism take shape as an identity? And why does it seem so immutable? Analyzing the messianic fervor of Zionism, she argues that it colors Israel's most profound self-image to this day. Rose also explores the message of dissidents, who, while believing themselves the true Zionists, warned at the outset against the dangers of statehood for the Jewish people. She suggests that these dissidents were prescient in their recognition of the legitimate claims of the Palestinian Arabs. In fact, she writes, their thinking holds the knowledge the Jewish state needs today in order to transform itself. In perhaps the most provocative part of her analysis, Rose proposes that the link between the Holocaust and the founding of the Jewish state, so often used to justify Israel's policies, needs to be rethought in terms of the shame felt by the first leaders of the nation toward their own European history. For anyone concerned with the conflict in Israel-Palestine, this timely book offers a unique understanding of Zionism as an unavoidable psychic and historical force.
Mountain against the Sea

Mountain against the Sea

Author: Salim Tamari
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520942426
Pages: 256
Year: 2008-11-03
This groundbreaking book on modern Palestinian culture goes beyond the usual focal point of the 1948 war to address the earlier, formative years. Drawing on previously unavailable biographies of Palestinians (including Palestinian Jews), Salim Tamari offers eleven vignettes of Palestine's cultural life in the momentous first half of the twentieth century. He brings to light the memoirs, diaries, letters, and other writings of six Jerusalem intellectuals whose lives spanned (and defined) the period of 1918-1948: a musician, a teacher, a former aristocrat, a doctor, a Bolshevik revolutionary, and a Jewish novelist. These essays present an integrated cultural history that illuminates a watershed in the modern social history of the Arab East, the formulation of the Arab Enlightenment.
The World as I See It

The World as I See It

Author: Albert Einstein, General Press
Publisher: GENERAL PRESS
ISBN: 9388118081
Pages: 240
Year: 2018-07-16
The most advanced and celebrated mind of the 20th Century, without a doubt, is attributed to Albert Einstein. This interesting book allows us to explore his beliefs, philosophical ideas, and opinions on many subjects. Subjects include politics, religion, education, the meaning of life, Jewish issues, the world economy, peace and pacifism. Einstein believed in the possibility of a peaceful world and in the high mission of science to serve human well-being. As we near the end of a century in which science has come to seem more and more remote from human values, Einstein's perspective is indispensable.
Let It Be Morning

Let It Be Morning

Author: Sayed Kashua
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 1555846629
Pages: 288
Year: 2007-12-01
A revealing portrait of the conflicted allegiances of Israeli Arabs in this searing new novel from one of the most daring voices of the Middle East. A young Arab journalist returns to his hometown—an Arab village within Israel—where his already vexed sense of belonging is forced into crisis when the village becomes a pawn in the never-ending power struggle that is the Middle East. Hoping to reclaim the simplicity of life among his kin, the prodigal son returns home to find that nothing is as he remembers: everything is smaller, the people are petty and provincial. But when Israeli tanks surround the village without warning or explanation, everyone inside is cut off from the outside world. As the situation grows increasingly dire, the village devolves into a Darwinian jungle, where paranoia quickly takes hold and threatens the community’s fragile equilibrium. In a novel that “relates the experience of those caught in the middle, the Arab-Israelis who are citizens but are separated from many of their countrymen by faith and heritage” (School Library Journal), Let It Be Morning, proves once again that Sayed Kashua is a fearless, prophetic observer of a political and human quagmire that offers no easy answers. “Kashua . . . writes about the Israeli Arabs’ balancing act with knowledge and passion.” —Publishers Weekly